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MedCity News: Can a pre-operative risk assessment tool reduce healthcare costs and improve outcomes?

MedCity News, Feb. 18, 2014

Health IT startup QPID Health, formed at Massachusetts General, has rolled out its first clinical decision support tool for its cloud-based platform, QPID. It works on top of providers’ electronic medical record systems and is designed to be used before high-cost, high-volume medical procedures. The idea is for physicians to use the tool to develop a better way to balance the need for a procedure with the patient’s risk factors, and it fits the healthcare industry trend of looking for ways to reduce healthcare costs.

The guide relies on QPID’s EMR search technology to upload information from the patient’s electronic health record. It calculates the level of risk associated with the procedure, whether it is appropriate for that patient, and also factors in models published in specialty guidelines. The risk assessment score is included in the consent forms that are discussed with the patient.

Clinicians can choose to use or ignore the recommendation but it’s designed to be factored into their decision making.

Read the full article: MedCity NewsFeb. 18, 2014

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QPID Health Announces Release of Q-Guide

Application promotes appropriate use and cuts costs related to pre-authorization and unnecessary surgical procedures.

Boston – February 18, 2014 – QPID Health, an innovative provider of clinical insights software solutions, today announced the release of the procedure decision support application Q-Guide. Based on the QPID clinical insights platform, the application addresses the need for providers to ensure appropriate procedures in order to improve patient care and reduce healthcare costs. The platform was developed jointly by QPID Health, Massachusetts General Hospital (MGH) and the Massachusetts General Hospital Physicians Organization (MGPO).

Used during the pre-operative decision making process, the application helps clinicians apply complex guidelines-based decision criteria to each patient’s individual profile, and generates a recommended approach and risk score. Measurement of procedural appropriate use is a strategic imperative for providers in an era of increasing provider accountability for improving quality while reducing the costs of care.

Q-Guide also can reduce the requirement for costly prior authorization, a labor-intensive process in which payers approve procedures in advance.

Piloted by 150 clinicians at Massachusetts General Hospital, Q-Guide has expedited the management of over 1100 procedures during the first 18 months of adoption.  MGH plans to use Q-Guide for more procedures in the future.   The Q-Guide application is available from QPID Health as part of its suite of applications built on the QPID platform. QPID delivers clinically relevant information from the mass of data stored in electronic patient records to expedite care decisions. QPID Health supports thousands of users across multiple departments at Massachusetts General Hospital and other Partners HealthCare hospitals, among other institutions.  Q-Guide can be accessed via a Web browser and is hosted in the cloud or in a client/server configuration.

“We want to ensure that patients treated by our physicians receive the most appropriate care based on nationally-approved guidelines and the patient’s own unique health status,” explained Timothy Ferris, MD, vice president of Population Health at the MGH/MGPO and Partners HealthCare.  “Physicians can benefit by using a powerful decision support tool and documenting adherence to evidence-based protocols. This is especially important in the context of changing payment models that reward for outcomes not procedures, and under which risk is shared by payers and providers.”

The MGH/MGPO continues to work with their payers to forgo prior authorization requirements for procedures where Q-Guide is in use. Prior authorization, a process in which permission to conduct a procedure is requested of an insurer, imposes a heavy administrative burden for both payers and healthcare providers. Making this step more efficient through systems like Q-Guide cuts costs from both sides of the equation, reducing administrative overhead and overall healthcare costs.

Mike Doyle, CEO of QPID Health, commented, “Through the use and distribution of the QPID platform we help skilled clinicians get access to up–to-date patient insights to make the best care decisions possible.  Q-Guide is an example of a revolutionary clinical application built on the QPID platform that will over the next few years save hospitals, insurance companies and the government millions of dollars in labor costs and time, and greatly facilitate the most appropriate level of care for the patient.”

Q-Guide uses decision-making algorithms that are driven by combining the patient’s clinical evidence with the latest guidelines and personalized risk models.  The first release of the software includes guidelines for high cost, high use and resource-intensive vascular, cardiac, and orthopedic surgical procedures.

About QPID Health

QPID is a clinical insights software solution that automatically delivers the most relevant patient information from electronic health records and other data sources into clinical and administrative workflows. With QPID, clinicians are more productive, patients benefit from personalized decisions, and hospitals gain cost efficiencies. The solution was developed at the Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston to address the persistent problem of too much data that is too hard to find.  QPID Health launched in late 2012 to bring the power of the QPID clinical insights platform to health systems nationwide. The company is venture backed by Matrix Partners, Partners Innovation Fund, Massachusetts General Physicians Organization (MGPO) and Cardinal Partners. Visit www.dev.qpidhealth.com for more information.

Media Contacts:

Nigel Smith
NextStep Communications
nigel@nextstepcomms.com
(781) 308-3317

Amy Krane
amy.krane@dev.qpidhealth.com
617 292 7743, x 122

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InformationWeek Healthcare tells the QPID story.

We couldn’t have said it better ourselves.  Veteran healthcare and technology reporter Dave Carr covers QPID “formula” in article  “QPID, a Partners HealthCare spinoff, creates a clinical decision support tool to solve physicians’ big gripe about EHRs — buried data.”

The sum of “Google, plus CliffsNotes,” might be the formula for making electronic health records software more usable, particularly in large hospital networks that use multiple EHR systems.

That formula is QPID Health CEO Mike Doyle’s shorthand for what his company does. It adds search and summarization technology as a layer on top of EHR software to provide more convenient access to patient data when needed most — the time doctors are making clinical decisions. The EHR world today is like “the Internet 20 years ago when we had all this data but no Google,” Doyle said in an interview. “EHRs have done a great job of capturing all this data, but not at making it particularly useful.”

Read the full article: http://www.informationweek.com/healthcare/analytics/can-this-search-tool-make-doctors-love-ehr/d/d-id/1113742?page_number=1

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InformationWeek Healthcare: Can This Search Tool Make Doctors Love EHR?

InformationWeek Healthcare, Feb. 7, 2014

QPID, a Partners HealthCare spinoff, creates a clinical decision support tool to solve physicians’ big gripe about EHRs — buried data.

The sum of “Google, plus CliffsNotes,” might be the formula for making electronic health records software more usable, particularly in large hospital networks that use multiple EHR systems.

That formula is QPID Health CEO Mike Doyle’s shorthand for what his company does. It adds search and summarization technology as a layer on top of EHR software to provide more convenient access to patient data when needed most — the time doctors are making clinical decisions. The EHR world today is like “the Internet 20 years ago when we had all this data but no Google,” Doyle said in an interview. “EHRs have done a great job of capturing all this data, but not at making it particularly useful.”

A few months ago, in a column called Why Doctors Hate EHR Software, I quoted a pediatrician named Dave Denton on his frustration with EHR software and particularly the “treasure hunt” he found himself going on to find which tab of which screen might contain clinically relevant information about any given patient. Denton sits on his hospital’s IT advisory board and believes in the potential of health IT, even as he is dismayed by the reality of it. Although the theory of EHR software is about getting all the information about a patient in one place, finding that information again is harder than it ought to be, he complained.

QPID just might be the map that makes the hunt a lot easier.

Read the full article: InformationWeek Healthcare, Feb. 7, 2014